Frightening Trends: Rooftopping

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Source: Rooftopper, Tom Ryaboi’s website.

While the unbelievably dangerous act of ‘rooftopping’ has emerged as a scary new trend throughout the country, it has in fact been of international popularity for a number of years. In recent months, it’s either just started to spread throughout Australia, or has only now been noticed by authorities. Either way, there’s no denying how incredibly risky and terrifying this trend is.

‘Rooftopping’ involves climbing to ridiculous heights and without harness, taking a photo to commemorate the moment. Photographer, Tom Ryaboi even boasts this dangerous pass-time as being his photographic edge. Posting numerous photos of himself in compromising positions, Tom’s main attraction on his website seems to be his first-listed category – rooftopping.

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Source: Rooftopper, Tom Ryaboi’s website.

Though most well-known rooftoppers are proud of their activity, many deny that they are influencing others. Particularly at risk are the impressionable youth, who, with all of the means to share their photos via social media, are becoming increasingly willing to do anything to give their amateur photography an edge.

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Instagram user and high-school student, ‘Nadanator’ posts one of Tom Ryaboi’s photos, along with her enthusiasm to follow the trend.

Like many other rooftoppers, Tom Ryaboi makes sure to conceal his identity in each of these shots to protect from the authorities – a move that is now being imitated by Australia’s more impressionable youth as the police try to crack down on the perpetrators. According to abc.net.au, Queensland police have started to use the images posted on social media sites to identify and fine the culprits as a possible deterrent. Unfortunately however, while the police are doing their best to put a stop to the trend, rooftoppers are proving to be defiant and brazen about their activity. ABC (abc.net.au) reports the response from Brisbane rooftopper, Blu Art Xinja, who says that the consequences don’t serve as a deterrent; he told them, “I think it is dangerous for people to get on top of buildings, but I personally don’t mind danger – a lot of people don’t,” continuing with, “Even if someone died in an accident from it I don’t think it would be deterrent if you like doing it anyway.” – from abc.net.au

Despite the fact that ‘rooftopping’ is what most consider to be a life-risking activity, well-known rooftoppers have a collection of loyal followers that believe in the “art” of their work. After doing the interview for ABC, Blu Art Xinja took to his Facebook page to brag about the article and of course his fans had his back.

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Source: Blu Art Xinja’s Facebook page.

While we’re all hoping for the craze to subside for the sake of safety, Blu Art Xinja has only one reason for his hope that the attention falls away – “I do hope the craze dies down so I can keep doing it with less eyes watching me.” he told abc.net.au

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